Education campaigns

Mike Tuffrey

 

Posted in: Campaigns & Activism, Policy & Research

Education campaigns

December 01, 1993

A group of prominent business leaders gathered at the end of September to launch a national education trust, aimed at improving the quality school-leavers seeking employment. Meanwhile The National Literacy Trust, a new independent charity aiming to improve reading and writing standards in the UK, was launched on October 7, with support from WH Smith.

NEW CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED

A group of prominent business leaders gathered at the end of September to launch a national education trust, aimed at improving the quality school-leavers seeking employment. The founder trustees of Industry in Education include the chairmen/chief executives of Midland Bank, Norwich Union, Vauxhall Motors, Cable and Wireless and the British Railways Board. It will be chaired by Michael Ashcroft, chairman of ADT. The trust is calling for many radical changes in education, including:

  • more certainty in the teaching of technology in schools
  • industry’s own learning programmes in schools for pupils aged 14 and over
  • minimum standards in numeracy, literacy, foreign languages and computer skills
  • a longer school day and a five-term school year
  • compulsory placement in industry for all trainee teachers

The trust aims to promote partnership between industry and education at all levels. Its first project will research the length of the school day and year. Contact Richard Painter, Industry in Education on 081 875 9799

SCIENCE FUND EXPANDS

Toyota announced on November 10 that it is donating £235,000 to 810 schools in the form of cash grants in the second year of its Science and Technology Education Fund. The Toyota Fund, a three year initiative aimed at developing science and technology in schools and supporting links between education and business, is run in conjunction with BITC. Over 70% of the awards donated so far have been matched by TECs, bringing the overall value of the Fund to more than £500,000. Grants ranging from £500 to £1,500 are awarded through the national network of Education Business Partnerships (EBPs) to support science and technology projects in schools, including teacher placements in industry. Primary schools are receiving 60% of the 341 grants available. Contact Stuart Dyble, Toyota, on 071 287 7171 or Ian Pearce, BITC, on 071 629 1600

LOW STANDARDS IN URBAN AREAS

Residents of disadvantaged urban areas are inadequately served by the education system, indicates a report carried out by the Office for Standards in Education (OFSTED). Access and Achievement in Urban Education surveyed seven deprived urban areas and found that the levels of attainment and teaching standards were generally low. Among the key findings were:

good pre-school provision increases the chances of children benefiting from schooling; however provision is patchy

underachievement is evident early in primary schools and many pupils suffer permanently from early failures in gaining basic skills

support for pupil with particular learning difficulties is especially poor

young people who have not performed well in GCSE examinations have few options for post 16 study open to them

The report calls for better long-term planning and co-ordination between services to meet the common aim of raising achievement. Contact OFSTED on 071 925 6800

LITERACY TRUST LAUNCHED

The National Literacy Trust, a new independent charity aiming to improve reading and writing standards in the UK, was launched on October 7, with support from WH Smith. One focus of the Trust will be the family and how parents can teach their children to read. It will promote good practice and highlight successful initiatives around the country. The Council of the National Literacy Trust will be chaired by Sir Simon Hornby of WH Smith which is providing office space. Neil McClelland, formerly CEO with Greenwich Borough Council, is the full-time director. Contact Neil McClelland 071 730 1200 x5451

CHALLENGE TO BUSINESS FROM FURTHER EDUCATION

Industry must have “high and intelligent” expectations of Britain’s newly-independent further education and sixth-form colleges, says the Council for Industry and Higher Education in a report published on October 21. Changing Colleges: Further Education in the Marketplace urges employers to contribute to setting national priorities and to establish themselves as the local customers of the colleges.

The 465 colleges of further education (including 116 sixth-form colleges) represent the primary source of practical and employment-related education in the country. With two million students, they cater for more of the over-16 population than the schools and universities put together. A 25% growth in the colleges over the next 3 years is planned. Contact Barbara Blake, CIHE, on 071 387 2171

TEACHER PLACEMENT MILESTONE

The 100,000th teacher placement in industry through the Teacher Placement Service was celebrated by the CBI at a reception on October 18. Organised by Understanding British Industry, a project of the CBI’s Education Foundation, the service was set up in 1988 to enable teachers to promote awareness of contemporary business in schools. Contact Peter Davies, Education Foundation, on 0865 722585

Corporate Citizenship Briefing, issue no: 13 – December, 1993

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