Technology News Round-Up (Issue 94)

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Posted in: Technology & Innovation

Technology News Round-Up (Issue 94)

July 31, 2007

Technology News Round-Up (Issue 94)

July 31 2007

by Briefing staff

Nokia in Africa, Dell’s ambitions to be the greenest ICT company in the world and Intel joining with One Laptop Per Child are all examples of how the technology industry is trying to become more responsible.

Nokia Siemens in Africa

The Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation’s European-African Telecommunications Roundtable met in Europe in June, and the EU-Africa Business Forum met, also in June, in Ghana.
This brought together leading decision makers from Africa, Europe and the telecoms industry and discussions centred on socio-economic issues associated with ICT, and the ways in which case studies from Europe could be adopted to fit emerging markets. Nokia and Nokia Siemens Networks were instrumental in both meetings, showcasing rural connectivity projects that can help build business, and mobile health data surveys that have the potential to address disease outbreaks. Nokia Siemens Networks comprises the former Networks Business Group of Nokia and the carrier-related businesses of Siemens.

Contact Nokia www.nokia.com; Nokia Siemens Networks www.nokiasiemensnetworks.com

Dell’s Zero Carbon Initiative

Dell has launched the Zero Carbon Initiative in a long-term effort to become the greenest technology company in the world. The initiative will address carbon offsetting, enhancing the company’s global recycling programme, the need for more environmentally friendly design models, and working with clients to reduce their energy expenditure. There will also be closer management of Dell’s direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions through a new system that will monitor and audit supply chain emissions.
Though Dell aims to cut its emissions by 15 per cent by 2012, it is up against tough competition. Hewlett-Packard has plans to cut energy consumption by 20 per cent in three years, while IBM has pledged to invest $1bn a year on increasing IT energy efficiency in their Project Big Green.

Contact Dell www.dell.com

Intel and One Laptop Per Child

Intel, the computing and microchip company, has joined forces with One Laptop Per Child, the not-for-profit organisation that aims to provide every child in the developing world with a laptop.
The partnership was announced on July 13, and it will enable the two organisations to explore collaborations involving technology and educational content. Intel will also join OLPC’s board.
Intel invests more than $100m annually promote education in emerging markets.
OLPC designs, manufactures and distributes laptops that are inexpensive and aims to provide every child in the world with access to modern forms of education.

The laptops will be sold to governments and are issued to children by schools. The machines are described as “durable” and one of the most noticeable features is that it is energy efficient and can be hand-powered. That is, in areas where most people live without electricity, a child can still use his/her laptop at home. The laptop is described as coming with at least two of three options: a crank, a pedal or a pull-cord to generate power for operation. Each laptop is expected to last five years.

Other partners include News Corporation, eBay and Google. The goal is to have the first machines ready for use by October 2007 and some the countries involved are Thailand, Nigeria, Libya, Uruguay and Rwanda.

Contact Intel 001 408 765 8080 www.intel.com; OLPC 001 617 452 5660 www.laptop.org

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